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20121003
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. but if there is no solution to the fiscal cliff, it will increase to 20%. sylvia hall, nbr, washington. >> tom: energy is one of those political issues that is part economic and part foreign policy. and it plays out every day in the trading pits. november crude oil futures settled at $91.37, down nearly half a percent. we continue our series "politics and the pits" with erika miller and oil trader john netto, president of m-3 capital. tomorrow, we continue "politics >> how are traders in general viewing the election? >> well, the election is opinions aside, and no entity. obama is ahead. all the polls in the key states, the battleground states, obama has a lead as well. the markets discounted an obama win, and as a result, this bullish for risk, and for oil as well. >> how high do you continuing crude could go? >> i think $96, $97. not because of an obama victory, but because of bifurcation economically around the world. oi. the split side, what happen fist we can have a romney victory. >> i think oil rallies in either case. if romney wins, it rallies more, because romney victory is risk conducive which woul
board. 1.74 billion on the nasdaq. the energy sector powered today's selling, down 0.9%. technology and financial sectors continued lower, down 0.8% and 0.7% respectively. as market excitement has died down over the latest federal reserve effort to stimulate the economy, oil prices have cooled off. oil fell below $90 per barrel for the first time since early august. in the latest week, the amount of foreign oil imported into the u.s. was down to its lowest level since december. and refineries cut back, fueling concerns about weaker demand. big energy stocks exxon and chevron both fell about 0.5%. they both traded at multi-year highs just last week. the worries about global energy demand have hit the energy service providers. halliburton was down 2.4% today, and its off more than 9% in less than two weeks. discouraging comments from electronics contractor jabil circuit weighed on the tech sector. late yesterday, the company reported disappointing results, blamed on weak demand in most of its businesses. shares fell 9.9%; volume jumped more than five times as the stock closed at its l
.e.o. at peabody energy. >> tom: the presidential election is only 43 days away. traders and investors are watching the race closely because the outcome will help determine the direction of the economy and financial markets. all this week well be talking to traders in the trenches to get their views on how politics influence the markets. today, erika miller spoke with jonathan corpina, a trader at the new york stock exchange. >> to the presidential election is only about six weeks away. how are traders in general viewing the election? >> it's a very interesting time right now. and if you look at our current election and the process, it's a tight race. every week the numbers cope changing. but not by that much where there is an outright expected winner at this point right now. so the uncertainty of how this election is going to pan out is somewhat helping this market. i think it's keeping more people in this market. >> reporter: you were on the floor four years ago. how does the mood today compare to back then. >> you know, the mood, i think, is a little bit different. the times are different, times
the food and energy component of cpi? so, i could be ben bernanke's speech writer because he says the same thing every time he goes in front of the senate is we don't see any particular problem with inflation. really, we don't corn prices just nearly double in three months. so, how is it there is no inflation? >> reporter: do you get any sense that the ethanol mandate is going to change under either administration under obama or if romney would get elected? >> well is sure seems like the word ethanol has turned into a pejorative and it's not exactly the most positive topic. i just don't know that turning food into gasoline is necessarily what we want to be doing in the long term. >> reporter: and it affects this market? >> you bet it does. as corn prices go up cattle prices go up. simple as that. that's an input cost to feeding cattle is corn, so you've got to take cattle prices higher to offset that. >> reporter: thanks very much. >> you bet. >> tom: a quiet ending to the third quarter for stocks the major indices falling. the s&p 500 spent the entire session in negative territory. it mad
0.6%, and the energy sector rising 0.5%. in the consumer staples sector, it was a couple of food stocks topping the gains. tyson foods may have benefited jpmorgan is named because it bought bear stearns as that investment bank was collapsing four and a half years ago. shares of jpm up 1.2% during the regular session it did see a little selling pressure in extended hours trading this is a single complaint alleging fraud. in the consumer staple sector it was a couple of food stocks topping the gains. tyson foods may have benefited from the american farm bureau responding to rumors of a bacon shortage last week. the farm group calls bacon shortage baloney. tyson saw heavier than usual volume with today's 4.3% rally. this is its highest price since july. and kraft foods finished at a new high on its last trading day as a combined company. after the close tonight, the company officially splits in two. its snack business, stuff like oreos, will be under the mondelez name. cheese and meats stay under the kraft title. kraft's replacement in the dow jones industrial average, united health
the upside with the u.s. being such a creative economy. for example, energy prices have fallen a lot. and there are some other things you can count to on the upside. but so far businesses have been very reluctant to invest heavily, very reluctant to hire heavily. >> muhamed el-erian what do you see-- when you look at all this data coming in, what is most important to you? >> a few things. first the employment picture. and not just whether we're creating jobs or not. that's important. but also what's happening to those who remain unemployed. and that is a pretty worsening picture. that's why i call 2 a crisis. because long-term unemployment is really high. and youth unemployment is really high. and these are longer-term issues that we need to deal with. so the employment picture is very important. second, clarity for businesses. today no one has the confidence to invest. there is a ton of money, judy, on the sideline, a ton of money. and if we can engage that money in the system would be great. and third as ken rightly said, the global economy. we are facing he is vore headwinds. so a
to teach. they have so much just native energy and enthusiasm about the world around them. they live in such a media-rich and digitally-rich and experience-rich environment now that it's-- it's made my job in some ways easier because what they bring into the classroom is really complex and interesting and it's my job to kind of harness that energy and that enthusiasm and direct it toward the things that i need them to learn as far as being 21st century communicators and thinkers and problem solvers. >> suarez: you often hear that teachers can tell who's going to have trouble in high school early on. in the earlier grades. do you agree with that? and is there anything else teachers can be doing in those early grades to help those kids out? >> i think what-- the best teachers are are seekers. we are given a family's child to teach. we're given their most precious resource, their child. and our job is to send them out better than when they walk through the door. and better doesn't necessarily mean that they can ace a standardized test. better means that i have seen deep within each chil
1.6%. then, it was energy and materials, both closely tied to the global economy, up 1.3% and 1.2%, respectively. the biggest percentage gainer of the dow industrials was general electric. the company slightly increased its forecast for revenue growth, even as the global economy remains choppy. that kind of optimism helped shares jump 2.9%. g.e. said its industrial businesses are gaining momentum. the shares certainly have been. tonight, they're at their highest price in four years. meantime, struggling dow industrial stock intel found buyers, up 1.9%. earlier this week, it traded at its lowest price this year. intel unveiled a new semiconductor for tablets, counting hewlett-packard, dell, and samsung among its customers. intel has been criticized for not moving faster into the tablet space. tomorrow is the end of the calendar third quarter, but we're seeing a handful of companies turn in their fiscal quarter results. discover financial found more customers were using their charge cards. earnings were stronger than expected as customers used their discover cards more and credit
not to build a nuclear bomb. iran insists that its nuclear energy is not weapons grade but for peaceful purposes like medical treatments. on thursday, israel's prime minister netanyahu had none of it. >> so at this late hour, there's only one way to peacefully present iran from getting atomic bombs and that's by placing a clear red line on iran's nuclear weapons program. red lines don't lead to war. red lines prevent war. >> the prime minister has urged the u.s. to set clear nuclear thresholds for iran. red lines, he said, meaning if iran crosses a red line, military action will be taken by israel. question, in the "wall street journal" this week, alan dershowitz called on obama to forget netanyahu's red line based on a qualifiable amount of enriched uranium and instead declare a black line. the u.s. will not tolerate iran to be in possession of nuclear arms. so who's right? the red line or the black line? mort? >> the israelis feel that if as netanyahu was pointing out, if you get the nuclear capabilities within 15 days of being able to launch rockets against israel, that is a disaster
year. >> well, it won't be finished next year. let me more specific, the international atomic energy agency in its report last month said that iran has produced 189 kilograms of this medium enriched uranium, the 20%. over half of that is already in the process of being converted to fuel planes for the tehran research reactor. so they have only about 91 kilograms right now, which is less than half of what you'd need even if you went to the additional step of 90% enrichment, which they are not doing. >> woodruff: so you're saying it's not as close as what he describes. robert satloff, how did you hear that? >> i heard it somewhat differently because what paul's comments don't incorporate are, a fenway park sill tease of which we're not aware. b, an increase in the number of centrifuges that would increase the amount produced and, c, the possibility that iran uses more advanced centrifuges between now and some future date that would make more product more quickly. >> woodruff: so you're saying there's more capacity there than what is known? >> well, i don't know any secrets but i'm sayi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10